Towards stopping terrorism in Nigeria

Stopping terror attacks across Nigeria is a capital project. It’s important that the right structures are put in place to end this menace on our soil once and for all.
We need surveillance in form of security cameras in public places. These cameras helped identify the perpetrators of the Boston incident in the U.S in about a week.

Security check points have to be established on our major roads, and communication between security units should be improved.

There’s also a need to monitor people living within the borders: biodata capturing, identity verification, among others. At this point, I think we need a mini version of NSA’s spy campaign. American citizens had felt offended by the scale of the NSA’s activities because it targeted American citizens living within the country’s borders. For them, the enemy was external. But here, the threat and the enemy is domestic, living next to us on our land. If giving up a little privacy to accountable Security institutions would help us get our peace and safety, I think it’s not too much a price.

Besides, I think our government forces are killing too many terrorists or terror suspects. Dead terrorists don’t talk. We need some of these persons alive, long enough, to give useful information on how their evil organization is structured, what the chain of command is like, where they get their arms from, how they move their arms-ware, etc.

I also hope we have undercover agents at work.

Every Nigerian counts. Every life is invaluable. These chains of killings must stop, and stop now. The government should get ‘serious’ on this matter and deal with it as it ought to. Anyone at all found to be funding terror groups should be seen as an enemy of the state and dealt with accordingly.

On the international stage, I want to make a charge that our immediate neighbours are not taking any visible steps in securing their borders. For years, the West African region has been plagued by the spread of small weapons and light arms, a problem fuelled by inefficient border policing. I think now is the time for Nigeria to ask these countries to be responsible with policing their borders and their people. And if they think they cannot do better than what they are ‘doing’ now, well, we in Nigeria are tired of hearing that some identified boko haram insurgents are from Niger or Chad, or that the insurgents have supply posts in the forests of Cameroon. If these countries won’t do something about these reports, we should. Perhaps if we comprehensively closed our land borders twenty four/seven for two weeks, they would get the picture better.

And should the government discover that our military need a little extra help, we should not be shy in demanding it. After all, we have put our soldiers’ lives on the line for other countries all over the world in the past. We could use some credit today.

The point is: stop these attacks. Kill terrorism in Nigeria.

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About Johnson Boyede

Johnson Boyede, B.Sc in International Relations. He wrote 'Addressing terrorism in Nigeria and possible spill over into West Africa' for his Long Essay. He contributes scholarly writings to an open facebook group, 'League of Diplomats'. He agrees and runs with the opinion of Paul Romer that, "Knowledge is a non-rival nature and only partly excludable... In an open society, knowledge's non-rival nature means that a piece of new information can be used over and over again, by different people, in varying contexts and to make new things...one good piece of knowledge will live several lifetimes, undergo different iterations and be put to ever more unique purposes."
Aside | This entry was posted in Counter-terrorism, Security and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

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